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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
. according to reuters, groups have been set up to look if remains of the meteorite. >> amazing video. nasa is emphasizing there is no connection between that meteor and a huge asteroid make a close trip past earth. these are images from radar chicago the asteroid named da-14 saying it will be the best opportunity ever to monitor a near miss. the space rocket is half the size of a football old. if i would like to check it out, the space and science center has a telescope viewing party at 7:00 tonight and nasa is broadcasting the fly by on their site at abc7news.com under "see it on tv." >> will there be obstructions in the sky? or anything fall down -- rain? >> isn't that creepy coincidence? noise video. now, at home, live doppler 7 hd shows no radar runs. it is dry. notice the lack of clouds. one area we talked about this, everyone will be clear but santa rosa, a little bit of fog and 1. 75 mile visibility. today, we will have a record or two that may fall with another warm day. the coast will be calm. mid-to-upper 60's. surging warmth around the bay and inland. for the bay 68 to 73, inlan
there are a million such objects out there. nasa is doing a very good job cataloging all the ones they can, but so far they've been able to find just about 10,000 of them. so we're a little ways away from having the complete inventory. >> schieffer: well, let me just ask you this question-- is there something the government ought to be doing or science ought to be doing that it's not doing? >> actually, believe it or not we are handling this one well. in 1995, nasa authorized-- or rather, congress authorized nasa to scan the skies 24 hours a at day, seven days a week, to look for these objects and we're doing it at three observatories in california, new mexico, and puerto rico. and those three observatories have accounted for about 98% of the bodies we know are out there. now, there are ways to defend ourselves once we know it's out there. and we have the technology to do it. it's just a question of putting the money together and deciding to do that. >> schieffer: all right well, that is a little bit reassuring, and thank you very much for helping us on something that most of us know absolutely nothin
. this is a serious thing right? people say why doesn't nasa do something about it, and there are cool old political reasons. first of all, it wasn't part of nasa's charter it wasn't human space flight or science it's just cataloging objects that are scientifically understood, blah blah blah blah. we work hard to raise awareness of this, and so oh, we are maybe getting there. cenk: how much money do you think is needed to catalog it? >> it's a great question. there's two things we do wrong as c.e.o. of a non-profit. we don't ask for money and then we don't ask for enough. cenk: so fix it right now. don't be like a down sore, fix it. >> we can approach the problem in two ways, first to get the sentinel spacecraft flying, that's about $450 million. then between now and when that could possibly happen, it's about that much money and then after that, to go deflect one it's about that much money. cenk: we're talking about a billion. >> 1.5 billion. it's what the curious city rover cost. we might find something on mars that might dare i say it, change the world. cenk: bush said let's go drill on mars, it'
there. go look it the web site on nasa. you can see every landing site. if anybody does not believe we ever went to the moon, does go look at that. [laughter] >> charlie, it's funny. i met you in texas. i did not know this but you were the guy who had some very famous words as apollo 11 was going through its trials and tribulations. talk about that. you are part of history for that. >> i was very fortunate to have been involved in five of the nine missions we sent to the moon. i started with apollo 10. it was not designed to land. i helped develop the procedures to activate the lunar module. i was in mission control when i started talking to them when they started the descent. that was a dress rehearsal for apollo 11. the first time we going to attempt the landing on the moon. neil armstrong asked me to do the same job for them on apollo 11. two months, we had to get ready. we modified the procedure somewhat. then we were ready to go. so i was in mission control of the dissent. as we started down, things started coming unglued we have computer problems. we had a trajectory problem take
to nasa, this was the biggest meteor to hit earth in over a century. weighing more than the eiffel tower. today, the search is on to find fragments that hit the ground. divers explore this frozen lake where one of the bigger chunks is thought to left a big hole in the ice. but they came up empty-handed. the site is a tourist spot for locals, wanting to see it for themselves. i want to show you something. this is the reason that so many people got injured, the broken glass. many checked on the big flash to the sky. and when they got there, the blast blew the windows out and sent the glass flying. >> extraordinary. kirit, thank you. and collectors are looking to buy remnants of that meteorite. >>> a powerful, new entry in the debate over gun control. the mother of hadiya pendleton made this video. >> a piece of my heart is gone. congress is debating how to fix our gun laws. they can start with background checks for all gun sales. tell congress to support common sense reforms so no more innocent children are killed. and no parent has to go through this heartbreak. >> this ad comes in the mi
it was a rocky meteor, about 10% iron. they believe a larger fragment is still under water. nasa says the meteor was 55 feet wide and weighed 10,000 tons. >>> more reaction today to the apparent suicide of country music star mindy mccready. she burst onto the music scene when she was just 18. as manuel bahorkes reports for wjz, her quick success was followed by a slow, painful, unraveling. >> i can tell he's going to ask me to dance ♪ >> reporter: mindy mccready rose to fame in 1996, with her debut album, 10,000 angels. but it was her life outside the recording studio that stole the spotlight. >> just google, and you'll see the images that pop up. she's got several mug shots. >> reporter: on top of stints in and out of jail and rehab, the singer was plagued by a long list of other problems. eight years ago, billy mcknight, the father of her oldest son, was charged with attempting to kill her. in 2008, she made headlines again over a rumored affair with baseball pitching legend roger clemens that reportedly started in her teens. two years later, on
closer than 1,700 miles from earth. while nasa was monitoring the situation closely, star gazers in australia, asia, and eastern europe were actually able to see the asteroid with bin oculars and telescopes. and that was 17,000 miles. excuse me. >> that's what i was going to ask you. did you duck, jackie? 17,000 miles. that was a close call. jackie deangelis, thanks very much for helping us on a friday evening. so, folks, is the obama administration openly break breaking the law? the president's recess appointments to the national labor relations board were deemed unconstitutional. that by a federal appeals court in washington, d.c. so why are this union-friendly board even in business right now? seems like a slap in the face. and our guest morgan brittany knows all about that union story. please stay with us. we'll be right back. >> i've been in love with bobby from the first time i saw him. and i've loved him ever since. pam, and i'm going to have him too. >> listen to me. you may be my sister, but i never want to see you again. look, if you have copd like me, you know it can b
died off. dr. collins and his team will have been frozen for three years. nasa, we just went through the 10th anniversary of the challenger explosion. those astronauts that sit on that rocket, those and now in the future, if you have a nasa facility in your district and they sit on that rocket to go up, they froze for three years. firefighters out in the west when the storms come this summer and they are coming, the firefighters you call on them and beg them to come in and fight. and the weather service, those of you from florida and the tornado area and hurricanes area, the weathermen stay around the clockworking, frozen for three years. border patrol, brian terry, the people that work with him that are on the border where gangs, violent gangs coming across the border, brosen. for three -- frozen for three years. d.e.a. and others. the doctors out at walter reed, if you go out and visit walter reed or go visit your v.a. hospital, the doctors and the nurses that are working with the wounded warriors, people who have lost their limbs in afghanistan and iraq, frozen for three years. wi
.s.-based telescopes to get a good look. but in australia some imagery is available and coming in thanks to nasa. as for a direct hit, well, astronomers worldwide are watching, they're excited but not worried. this asteroid's about half a football field long or roughly the size of a 12-story building like this. that certainly is big enough to wipe out a city, but scientists say at least today that is not going to happen. the real threat, though small, is to communications satellites like the ones we at fox news use. the geosynchronous plane is 22,000 miles around the earth, and da14 penetrates at 1:24 eastern, just a little more than an hour from now, coming 17,000 miles from earth, exiting at 3:24. satellite companies have been warned. they do not expect any satellite will actually be hit though. with about a million asteroids and meteors flying around earth's orbit, astronomers and telescopes around the planet are constantly looking up. >> we've seen and trackedded about 9,000 of them right now, and about a thousand of them are potentially hazardous. so we look at those carefully, and it turns
. lawrence seaway. he created nasa, which led the way to the kennedy years in going to the moon. barack, the federal troops to protect school girls going to school and dealing with the implementation of brown. the virtues of eisenhower were quite strong. n a thirdhave won third to term. host: this from twitter. guest: well, of course, depending on how you look at things. some people vote for the lesser of two evils. many dreamed for a third party s.at never quite cohere the leader roosevelt had a party -- theodore roosevelt had a party because people did not want to vote for taft or wilson. he could not win with a third party. george wallace grabbed a hold of the south. h. ross perot got 19% of the vote. there are times enough people say, i cannot vote for either of these guys any third-party movement starts coherent but they usually only get so far. host: what about the role of congress at the time of the president's second term? this comes from twitter from sharonb. guest: well,look. there is truth to that. you have to have a president that is willing to do business. bill clinton made
katrina, sandy reshaped the coastline and devastated homes, businesses and lives. nasa says the evidence shows humans are contributing to global warming. still, the realities in washington test the bounds of how we as a nation respond. in his state of the union address, the president told members of congress that if they don't act, he will. >> eye will direct my cabinet to come up with actions we can take to reduce pollution, prepare communities for climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy. >> last year president obama rejected a permit to build the keystone pipeline. but democrats are torn between a base of supporters who strongly oppose the project and the potential business boom by adding thousands of new jobs into the work force. that permit now rests in the hands of the state department, and secretary john kerry, who in august suggested climate change is as dangerous as iran, nuclear weapons, and war. now, on february 8, kerry met with canada's foreign minister, and he promised a fair, transparent and prompt decision on that. i don't know. it's
's operation of the national airspace system, nasa's space exploration program, and noaa's work on necessary new satellites. these are weather satellite programs. these are sequestration's negative impacts. the diverse group of leaders here with us today is going to be attesting to this. regarding the overall economy, about six months ago we released a study conducted by dr. stephen fuller of george mason university. the study's methodology is sound and its conclusions are grim. the study says, see quest racial -- sequestration, if it goes forward, will put 2.1 million u.s. jobs at risk. these are defense and non-defense-related jobs, and include nearly 1 million small businesses. it will cost the unemployment rate to rise about 1.5%, and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion. $215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast reinforces the conclusion, that sequestration will undermine economic growth. today we are re-releasing dr. fuller's study and his analysis of the impact of impact of sequestration. let it be noted no one can say that they were not forewarned about the
, that the nasa got to run the space program without o.m.b. folks saying you do this, you do that. are senator rockefeller cheers to the committee. i want to thank you for that. because what you did was -- you smoothed it out so that senator kay bailey hutchinson and i and we got direction for the space program three years ago that otherwise was in turmoil. that is in no small measure to what you did. i want the folks to know that is what you did and i want you to know how much this senator appreciates it. i want to ask you -- we got all of this international finance stirring. a lot of it is going to run under your authority. give me your thoughts on it. >> the international financial situation is one that we do have to watch closely. as much as we try to do our own business, we can't separate ourself from the world entirely. we can make sure our financial institutions are sound, we can make sure we run our policies appropriately. look at europe. they are the largest export partner. if they have a financial crisis that is something we have to worry about. if confirmed, i would work on but i've
started to massage and perhaps is the best way that the nasa administrator scot to run the space program without the omb folks saying you do this, you do that pursuant to directives given in the act which senator rockefeller chairs the commerce committee. and i want to thank you for that because what you did, use move the debt out so that the senator kay bailey hutchison and i could bring unanimity and we got a better option for the space program three years ago that other wise was in turmoil and that is in her no small measure to what you did. i want the folks to know that what you did and how much the center appreciates it. i want to ask you a -- we have all of this international finance stirring and a lot of it is going to run under. to give me your thoughts on that. >> senator, the international financial situation is one that we do have to watch very closely. as much as we try to do our own business we can't separate ourselves from the world entirely. we can make sure that our financial institutions are sound and that we run our policy is appropriately. europe is our largest export
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)